Hepatitis A, B, C Vaccination, Hepatitis prevention

Protecting against Hepatitis A, B, C via Vaccination!!

Hepatitis is generally an infection that has an impact on the liver. The different types of hepatitis are Hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E. Each of these viruses is diverse. Hepatitis leads to liver inflammation and might be severe or even critical. A number of safe and efficacious vaccines are available that are known to prevent hepatitis A and B (but not for type C). Also, a combination vaccine is available that guards against hepatitis A and B. Hepatitis A virus infection is transient and spreads via oro-fecal route. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) can be transitory or long-lasting and spreads via the parenteral route.

Vaccination of Hepatitis A:

This type of infection can be mild with no signs or a severe ailment that can infrequently result in liver failure and ultimately death. Getting vaccinated against this type of virus is the finest way to put off these problems. This vaccine does not lead to hepatitis as it does not comprise of the live virus. It is comprised of inactivated hepatitis A virus. The vaccine exerts its activity by promoting the body to form antibodies, which are proteins that have the ability to guard and kill the virus and prevent this infection. Hepatitis A vaccine can be employed for preventing the disease resulting from hepatitis A virus in individuals with age 12 months and older. Two doses of this vaccine are required for long-lasting defense. These doses must be given at an interval of 6 months. It is recommended to always wash your hands with soap and water after using the washroom, or prior to preparing or eating food. For a recent exposure to any person with hepatitis A infection, it is best to visit your healthcare provider regarding your necessity for hepatitis A vaccine or a dose of immune globulin (IG).

Hepatitis B vaccine:

Getting vaccinated against hepatitis B is the best way to prevent this infection. 2 to 3 shots are given over a duration of 1 to 6 months, based on brand. Whenever a female is pregnant, she must be tested for hepatitis B; infants born to HBV-infected mothers must be given HBIG (hepatitis B immune globulin) as well as vaccine within 12 hours of birth.

Plan of administration of 3-dose hepatitis B vaccine in infants-

The hepatitis B vaccine is a shot (an injection) that is usually given in the arm as well as a three-dose series on a 0, 1, and 6-month timetable. The advisable doses are based upon the vaccine brand as well as the individual’s age.

  • 1st Shot - At any given time, but newborns must get this dose in the delivery room.
  • 2nd Shot - At least 1 month (28 days) following the first shot.
  • 3rd Shot - At least 4 months (or 16 weeks) subsequent to the first shot (or at least 2 months following the second shot). Infants must be a minimum of 24 weeks in age at the time of the third shot.

two-dose Hepatitis B Vaccine timetable for adults-

In 2017, the FDA approved a vaccine in the U.S. Heplisav-B (Dynavax). It is a 2-dose vaccine approved for use in adults with age 18 years and above. The vaccine can be administered as 2 doses given 1-month apart.

Hepatitis C vaccine:

An individual gets hepatitis C from blood-to-blood contact from an infected individual. Needle sharing for intravenous medication use is the most common means of spreading the virus. Currently, no vaccine is available to prevent hepatitis C infection. The transmission of HCV occurs by sex, but this is not widespread. Numerous hepatitis drugs are available to treat hepatitis C, and these are direct-acting antiretrovirals. All these drugs act to stop the hepatitis C virus from replicating, in due course destroy it.